Published: Wed, October 04, 2017
Science | By Tyler Owen

Facebook Messenger Lite is heading to the US, UK, Canada, and Ireland

Facebook Messenger Lite is heading to the US, UK, Canada, and Ireland

Nothing more, nothing less.

Facebook Messenger Lite originally made its debut in emerging smartphone markets where data networks are slower than what's offered by most US carriers.

As for Facebook Messenger, the app has always had its own set of emojis, but according to Android Police, it seems that Facebook has made a decision to revert the emojis back to the same emojis that the Facebook platform uses.

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Last year Facebook forced users to adopt Messenger if they want to send each other direct messages, instead of the main Facebook site or app. Messenger Lite eliminates some of the newer and more processor-heavy features in the traditional Facebook Messenger app. There may also be some users who prefer a barebones version of Messenger, as it looks less cluttered and simpler to use. It is bad news for iPhone owners that Facebook hasn't worked on providing Messenger Lite to them and even have no idea of fitting it, reported by Techcrunch. Lite messenger has one difference to the regular messenger that it has no Snapchat like messenger day function or games. The file for the app is less than 10MB, and since it sticks to text-based messaging you're not going to end up in a situation where the app is sucking up data for things like GIFs or additional features you're not going to use. Canada, UK, and Ireland after previously being available in over 100 mostly-developing countries. From now on, Android and web users will see Facebook's emoji, while iOS users will see Apple's emoji.

"More than 1 billion people around the world use Messenger every month from a range of mobile devices on networks of various speeds and reliability". That is not to say that adults won't use it. People in developed countries also have to deal with expensive data.

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